Well then, good night!

Well then, good night!
Well then
Well then

One in two adults sleep poorly. Why do we need sleep, what happens in the body during rest time, how to sleep better, says expert Juergen Zulley.

Our ancestors taught her life after the sun. When she rose, she stood up and began the day’s work. When she went down, they lay down to sleep. Between them they probably slept soundly, because she had physically worked hard during the day.

Today we live in a world where very few have to exert themselves physically, but 24 hours can have action. Late run through the discos, surf the Internet, visit the midnight show at the cinema – actually there is no time to sleep. We have it no less necessary than our ancestors. We shimmy between sensory overload and short nights through the wonder of life and ourselves that we are sleeping badly, even though we are so tired. Sleep researcher Juergen Zulley answered questions about sleep.

Why Sleep is a basic need?

Sleep brings relaxation for body and mind. The organism on the one hand, the metabolism back up a gear, on the other hand its repair mechanisms are working at full speed. Growth hormones to build muscle strength and bone density, repair materials penetrate the skin, the immune system get new energy. The brain stores the impressions of the day and dump them into the appropriate drawers, the nervous system stabilizes.

Approximately every 90 minutes, alternate periods of so-called REM sleep and deep sleep. “SEM” stands for Rapid Eye Movement (= rapid eye movement). The rapid eye movement behind eyelids shot shows the REM sleep. During the night, the deep sleep phases are shorter and the REM sleep longer. For the rest the night of deep sleep stages are critical. Anyone who spends a restless night, will have the following more prolonged and deep sleep – the body automatically gets the rest he needs.

Sleep is a basic need that must meet more regularly as we eat and drink. Just one sleepless night completely inserted into the bone. Prolonged sleep deprivation a person physically and mentally exhausted from completely. The record holder in the Guinness book was supposedly awake for 19 days and was then temporarily massive physical and mental disorders. The longest time spent awake scientifically accompanied a student in the mid 60s, with eleven days. He suffered from severe hallucinations at the end, it recovered completely within a few days of the experiment.